Western Libraries

Law 5110 Constitutional

John & Dotsa Family Law Library

Constitutional Law Research: Caselaw and Statutes

Once you have collected some good caselaw, move your research online to not only find the actual documents (judicial decisions) but also to expand your research and to make sure that the cases you are depending on still represent good law. The following represent the more general online sources for finding caselaw. The Law Library also subscribes to specialty databases covering more specific legal topics as well as covering non-Canadian jurisdictions.

CanLII

CanLII is a non-profit organization managed by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. CanLII's goal is to make Canadian law accessible for free on the Internet. This website provides access to court judgments, tribunal decisions, statutes and regulations from all Canadian jurisdictions. CanLII does provide a noting-up service. When you pull up a case, look for the link at the top "cited by.....documents".

Lexis Advance Quicklaw

Review basic Constitutional Law content by browsing Sources for the practice area or by drilling through the legal Topic. Look for caselaw digesting services, which may help you to break down your topic or for specialized secondary sources such as Halsbury’s Laws of Canada - Constitutional Law (Charter of Rights) (Newman), and Constitutional Law (Division of Powers) (Mason, Régimbald).

The Quickcite service (look for treatment icons beside cases) will note-up caselaw - directing you to subsequent treatment and judicial history of a case.

Access is restricted to Law faculty, staff and students, who receive a personal password as part of an educational agreement between the Law School and LexisNexis Canada. Western Libraries also subscribes to Nexis Uni (formally LexisNexis Academic) for non-law users (content may differ).

Westlaw Edge Canada

LawSource provides access to material useful for research in Constitutional law. The Canadian Abridgment Case Digests for Constitutional Law (CNL) are reproduced online, are fully searchable and link to the full-text decisions. The Canadian Encyclopedic Digest (Constitutional Law)  is also reproduced electronically and can be browsed or searched. Caselaw searches can be limited to the CANCONST-CS database. The earliest reported case is from 1832.

The Keycite service will note-up caselaw - directing you to subsequent treatment and judicial history of a case.

Law faculty, staff and students receive a personal password as part of an educational agreement between the Law School and Thomson Reuters. Western Libraries also subscribes to a campus-wide version of Westlaw Edge for non-law users (access  is  restricted  for  use  within  Western  Libraries locations and  affiliates).

 

Once you have collected references to legislation, move your research online to not only find the actual documents (statutes, bills, regulations) but also to expand your research and to make sure that what you are depending on still represents good law. The following represent the more general online sources for finding legislation. The Law Library also subscribes to specialty databases covering more specific legal topics as well as covering non-Canadian jurisdictions. For a more detailed guide to carrying out legislative research, please refer to our research guides: Ontario Legislative Research and Federal Legislative Research.

CanLII

CanLII is a non-profit organization managed by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. CanLII's goal is to make Canadian law accessible for free on the Internet. This website provides access to court judgments, tribunal decisions, statutes and regulations from all Canadian jurisdictions. CanLII provides historical versions of statutes and regulations.

You can also search for documents citing a statute or regulation by clicking on the noteup button at the top of the screen.

Ontario e-Laws

Both annual and consolidated Ontario statutes and regulations are available on the Ontario e-laws website. Laws found on the e-laws website are official versions.

Period in time law contains historical consolidated versions of statutes and regulations going back to January 2004. These consolidations provide a snapshot of statutes and regulations as they existed at various periods in time.

Lexis Advance Quicklaw

Pull up the text of federal and provincial statutes and regulations by browsing the Category of legislation, the Jurisdiction, or by drilling through Topics down to the legislative authority.

The Quickcite Legislation Citator service (look for icon beside each section of a statute) will link sections of legislation to citing caselaw. Lexis Advance Quicklaw also  provides a Point In Time  link from a section of a consolidated version of a statute  to past versions of that particular section.

Westlaw Edge Canada

WL includes the text of statutes and regulations. When the document is brought up, there are links to Citing References, Annotations, and Memoranda (the law library does not subscribe to the full-text of memoranda but the outline of the memos is accessible). Citing References will direct you to caselaw, which cites the section of the statute or regulation. This is the online version of the print Canadian Abridgment: Statutes Judicially Considered.